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Old 02-23-2014, 10:13 PM   #1
 
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The Ultimate Guide to Your VSR 10

Lately I have seen a lot of questions pertaining to this rifle. Having a few years of experience with this rifle, as well as encountering a large number of issues along the way, I felt that it would be good to write it all out for all of you.

NOTE: THIS IS JUST WHAT I HAVE SO FAR. I AM STILL WORKING ON THE REST SO BARE WITH ME...

The Ultimate Guide to your VSR 10

Welcome! If you are reading this, you are probably looking for some assistance in your efforts to building your sniper rifle. Whether it be your first, second or even tenth build, hopefully this guide will answer some questions that you may have along the way. This way, you can continue to use your rifle and build it to be the best that it can be, without letting the pesky little issues that come with building any airsoft gun get in the way. Along the way of building my VSR 10, I came across what felt like every possible problem in the book, some of which took quite some time to figure out, and others were a quick fix. The goal of this guide is to help you get through these issues quickly without much of a hassle or stress. In addition, this guide will help answer any questions you have about the upgrading process, and how to go about this mind bobbling task on a strict or if you are lucky/fortunate, loose budget. So with that, I give you the ultimate guide to building your VSR 10, good luck!

Table of Contents

Choosing the Rifle:

First things first, its time to choose the right rifle for you. Now this shouldn’t be too hard, after all this is the guide to your VSR 10. You are either reading this because you already have the rifle or you plan on buying it very soon. However, there are various VSR 10 rifles out there, and multiple routes to go.

There are a few VSR 10’s out there that would be just fine to choose, but some are to be avoided. When looking to buy your rifle, avoid one’s that take a mix of VSR 10 and l96 parts, or to be more technical, PSS10 and PSS96 parts. For instance the AGM l96 runs a mix of these parts, making it a bit more complicated to upgrade. With that said, avoid any AGM model VSR 10 for it is likely to be built the same way. Stick with the known to use VSR 10 (PSS10) parts such as the JG Bar 10 and the TM VSR 10. Both of these are very common on the airsoft web stores, and are easy to find and purchase. I personally went the route of the TM VSR 10, but either will do, and serve as a fantastic base for upgrading.

While the JG Bar 10 is much cheaper than the TM VSR 10, and most of the internals will be parted with anyways for aftermarket ones in the long run, there are some pros of going with the TM over the JG. For one, the TM in my experience, has better overall quality. The mag catch and magazine well fit well with the mags and popping them in and out is a breeze. With the JG, the mags are a bit tighter of a fit. I found that the JG mags were slightly different than the TM, and the JG served a bit tighter in the TM mag well. Overall, the TM’s dimensions in proportion to its mags seemed to be a better fit and provided for smoother reloads.

In addition, depending on how long you plan on waiting between upgrades, going with the TM will provide with more consistent shooting out of the box. Despite its weak spring, the range is not affected near as much as one might think. The TM designed hop up with a TM bucking stuck in there provides with ample results despite being in stock form. To this day, I still run a stock TM hop up with the exception of an aftermarket hop up arm. But we will get to that later.

Basically, what you can take away from this, is that overall quality of the rifle goes to the TM VSR 10, which has the heftier price tag. But like said above, depending on how long you plan on keeping certain areas of the rifle in stock form, it may be a wise choice to go with the better model. But both serve as great platforms and you cannot really go wrong with the decision as either way, some work will need to be done to the rifle to get it performing better than your average long range rifle.

So its up to you, make the choice based on your wallet, your needs, while also considering your plans for the rifle in the future. By considering all of these things, you can make the decision that is best for you.



Got the Rifle, Now What?

Okay, so now you have acquired your rifle and you are wondering what to do next. This is where things can seem overwhelming. When I got my first sniper rifle, I used it for over a year before even considering upgrading it? Why you ask? Well firstly, I was new to using sniper rifles, and hadn’t even dived into the upgrade section of the webstores yet. I was more worried about getting enough cash together for an extra mag and a pouch to carry my gear in games (money was tight back then).

But with these struggles, came a good time to figure out the role of using a sniper rifle. If you are new to sniper rifles, this section is going to be important. If you are here just looking for some information in regards to building your sniper rifle, and have done so before, this section may not deem necessary. But feel free to continue reading.

So you have your rifle, and are getting accustomed to using it. Common amongst the VSR 10’s come a few things that are noticeable out of the box.

Specifically with the TM VSR 10, you will notice a lack of fps due to laws overseas regarding the fps output of the air rifles. Shooting around 280-300 fps out of the box, you will notice time from shot to target takes a bit longer than you would like. However, it is important to note that this rifle in its stock form is not built to be shooting at a higher fps output. With that said, don’t just go sticking in a hefty ass spring, and have it shooting at above 500 fps. This rifle will break on you and the parts are not built to last in general, let alone at that fps output.

If running the rifle in stock form before even diving into upgrading, it is important to choose the bb right for you. In my experience, the VSR 10 in stock form has a hop up that is much weaker than its friend the l96. The hop up lacks overall power, and using heavier weight bbs, especially in stock form, is going to be hard. However, out of the box, .28s will do just fine. And with the rifle shooting in the low 300s, the .28s will serve well, and will not be flying all over the place. I have found that the .28s can be carried, but require the hop up setting to be placed on 95% power. With that said, the heavy .36s, .4s, etc. that you find, will not be very effective in this stock rifle.

In regards to the JG Bar 10, shooting at over 400 fps out of the box, has an ability to use heavier weight bbs with less of an issue. With that said, you have some more options in regards to bb weight, but its up to you. I recommend trying several weights and actually stocking up on all kinds of weights to use. I sometimes find myself switching springs depending on the field of play, and have various bb weights that will meet my needs for that specific fps output. Its all trial and error, mixed in with some personal preference and how you like to have your rifle shooting. For me, its all about consistency and ability to shooting accurately, as in least effected by wind, while being able to reach out further than the standard AEG. We will dive into bb weights further during the upgrading process, when you have more options regarding fps, hop up settings, etc. But for now, just remember that the TM rifle in stock form, has trouble carrying the heavy weight bbs, and the .28s are recommended for best performance.

By now, you have been getting used to using your rifle and are itching to take it to the next level. You start your computer up and go to the webstore to check out some aftermarket parts that can get your rifle shooting like a champ. Before we go any further, here are a few of my favorite STATESIDE stores for ordering parts from.

-Evike
-Airsoft Atlanta
-Airsoft GI

These three carry a variety of parts and have everything from buckings to new sears for your trigger box. These are the places I usually order from, with the exception of my Action Army Parts which I get right from Action Army due to them either being out of stock or the specific part I need not being sold in stores.

You may notice that there are a variety of upgrades available, and lots of routes to go. Your rifle is in stock form, so remember that there are so many options. But upon adding everything you want to your shopping cart, you realize that you don’t have nearly the funds required to make the purchase. This is where choosing the upgrades to make becomes a little tricky. When it comes to upgrading, there are certain pieces that go together in the VSR 10 series design, and are required in order to function. With that said, this next portion of the guide will help you in determining which upgrades to make and in what order, so that you do not find yourself with a bunch of upgrades that you cannot install because you are missing other pieces necessary for it to function.

Upgrading the Rifle:

Depending on your financial situation, you may be able to buy more parts than what is written below. However, this chart of sorts is meant to help organize and prioritize what you need now, and what you can hold off on until future purchases. If you can make multiple of these purchases at one time, then go for it, but this guide will break it down into small and itty bitty pieces.

Upgrade 1: In my experience, the VSR 10 series rifles and any bolt action rifle in generally lacks overall durability. The stock trigger boxes, specifically the sears and the shell itself are weak and prone to breaking quickly. If I had a dollar every time someone’s rifle started slam firing, I would probably have enough money to pay the rent for a month or two. People are often confused why this happens, despite not upgrading the spring at all. This reinforces what I said earlier, in that the rifles are prone to breaking because the parts are overall lacking durability and quality control. Top that with the high fps output that the UTG mk96 series rifles have and you got yourself a problem. Lucky for you, the JG Bar 10 only runs at 400 fps as opposed to the 500 fps that the UTG l96 runs, so you are good right? Wrong. The VSR 10 series trigger boxes are some of the worst and the sears will break sooner than later. Whether you have the TM VSR 10 or JG Bar 10, the trigger unit is the place to start for making sure your rifle performs in the long run. With that, here are a list of upgrades to make during your first purchase.

-New trigger unit: The laylax zero trigger is one of my favorite, and has served me well in the 3+ years of using it. The light trigger pull makes it easy to fire and is smooth and effortless. In comparison to the stock rifle, you will notice a difference, and you will never want to go back. It’s well worth the money, but if you are on a budget, you can look into a new sear set, including the trigger and piston sear. However, be cautious that while you are reinforcing the sears, the shell to the trigger box itself is plastic and is prone to cracking or breaking as well. There are aftermarket shells available, but I find that a new trigger box in general is worth the no hassle. You can also look into the Action Army Trigger unit which is a clone of the laylax. But don’t let that fool you, the AA trigger is well worth it and after using one first hand, I am confident that this trigger unit is a safe alternative to the laylax version.
-New Piston: With the new trigger unit comes the need for a new piston. The stock version uses a 45 degree system, but the laylax and AA triggers use the 90 degree system. If you are just purchasing the trigger sear set be sure to know what you are dealing with and to see if a piston is needed to go with it as well. There are aftermarket pistons that are with the 45 degree system and others with the 90 degree system. For instance, the red laylax piston is meant to work with the stock trigger unit, while the orange laylax piston works and often comes with the aftermarket laylax zero trigger. In addition, the Action Army Orange piston works with the stock trigger unit, while the blue AA piston goes with the aftermarket trigger unit using the 90 degree system. And yes, I know what you are thinking. The Laylax zero trigger does work with the blue Action Army Piston. Since AA cloned the laylax zero trigger and piston, they will work together. But remember, you need to go the blue one, otherwise you will have compatibility issues with z-trig.

These two upgrades, which go together, will help alleviate the possibility of slam firing and any similar issues. Slam firing is one of the most common issues with bolt action rifles and to get rid of the possibility of this happening early, will prove to be beneficial in the future. While I am a big believer in upgrading the hop up unit first as it deals with performance and getting the rifle shooting accurately and consistently, I just cannot trust the stock trigger units on the VSR 10 series enough to use them for more than a brief period of time. With that said, upgrade them now and avoid the unavoidable issue in the future.

Remember, its not a matter of if it will break, its when it will break.

Now that you have added these two purchases to the cart, you can keep on shopping! The good news is that you have now gotten your durability parts under control and can look into upgrading the spring. I know what you are thinking though, what about the other cylinder parts that require upgrading for increase in durability. Well, if you are on a budget, and are struggling to get all the parts you need right away, have no fear. You can hold off on the cylinder head for the time being because the stock head is not going to break on you any time soon. In addition, the cylinder itself is strong enough to hold its own. While an aftermarket cylinder makes bolt pull a breeze, upgrading this expensive item now is not required. But again, if you have the funds, go for it. Lastly, the spring guide, while plastic and cheaply made, can actually hold its own. I ran a stock spring guide in a rifle shooting 450+ fps for a few months before switching over to a laylax spring guide. With that said, if money is tight, you can skip on this for the time being.

-Aftermarket Spring: Depending on where you play and your field regulations, it will determine which fps output is right for you. Just know that fps is not everything. I got a rifle shooting sub 400 fps out to over 200 feet easy. However, fps does play a role, and to get that extra push I now run a rifle shooting 465 fps, pushing out to 250 feet on a good day.

Since there are many variables that determine fps output including bucking, overall how well your rifle is sealed, the barrel you run, etc. it is hard to say that “this” spring will run you at “this” fps. Therefore, trial and error may be required for you to figure out what works for you and which spring will get you shooting at the desired fps.

So now you have the following three upgrades added to the list. Some of you may be thinking why the spring is on there now, and not last on the list. While there are many routes to go in upgrading a rifle, the VSR 10 series, due to lack of overall durability requires a new trigger box or sear set almost instantly. By doing so, you now allow yourself to upgrade the spring without fear of breaking or damaging the sears. This also gives you the opportunity to get your rifle shooting above the 280 fps that your rifle (if you run the TM) is shooting out of the box. This varies from upgrading the l96 such as the UTG mk96 because that rifle comes shooting 400+ out of the box, and its 90 degree trigger system is slightly more durable and able to stay in stock form for a longer period of time.

So by making these upgrades, you set yourself up for success in the future, and you can begin to work towards the rifle of your dreams.

After making your first upgrade purchase, you now have the following…
-Aftermarket trigger box, piston and spring

While you save up some more money, in the meantime, you can work on your rifle and perform some DIY mods to get your rifle performing better. These vary from inside the hop up to the cylinder unit, as well as within the stock of your rifle as well. Before we move ahead to your second upgrade purchase, we will now direct our attention to some DIY mods that can help you get your rifle performing the way it should.

DIY (Do It Yourself) Mods

-Barrel spacers: I put this as the first one because this is such an easy mod that makes a world of difference. The stock rifle usually comes with one or two spacers, but neither are of good quality and often don’t do the job that they are built to do. The idea behind the barrel spacer is to eliminate barrel vibration when the rifle is fired. You may notice when dissembling your rifle that your inner barrel wobbles like a motha tucka, and is not stable at all. Now imagine firing it, and the barrel beings vibrating frantically while a bb is traveling down the barrel trying to make its way to the designated target. By putting in some spacers, you can eliminate this barrel wobble and allow for more consistent and accurate shooting.

Simply wrap some duct tape (preferred over electric tape due to its ability to stay on tight on the barrel) around the barrel until it fits tightly inside the outer barrel. Note that the VSR 10 series uses a barrel that has a circumference that gets wider as it goes from end of barrel towards the receiver. Keep this in mind when building your spacers and be sure to make the ones on the tip of the barrel smaller than the ones on the end towards the receiver. I recommend at least three spacers evenly placed along the inner barrel to get the job done.





-Shim the hop up unit: The hop up unit has an issue that almost every VSR user has come across. The “right curve” issue. Many users will notice that their VSR 10 is constantly shooting and curving to the right after around 100-120 feet. This issue is a result of the uneven pressure on the hop up bucking and in turn uneven pressure on the bb. To the untrained eye, nothing will look like its uneven in the hop up. But if you look closely and fiddle with the hop up, you will notice that the hop up arm pops slightly in and out, bending every once and awhile. By once and a while, I am referring to the fact that this bending occurs but sometimes fixes itself. Hence, when shooting the rifle you may notice that your right curve issue is not 100% of the time, but still enough that its noticeable and effects overall performance of your rifle. I discovered this issue by examining the chamber with the barrel installed. I slide the hop up arm back and forth and noticed the bending taking place. To remedy this, simply add a shim to the hop up unit and keep it in place with a screw. This will keep the arm from bending up, and allows for even pressure on the hop up bucking and again, in turn, on the bb itself.

Here is a video with the shim (brass) to help you get a better idea:
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:14 PM   #2
 
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-Teflon tape the cylinder head: This one is simple, quick and effective. Simply wrap some Teflon tape around the cylinder head, enough to get a nice tight seal in the cylinder. Put a bit of white lithium grease on the tape to allow it to smoothly screw into the top of the cylinder.



-White lithium grease on the cylinder unit: This grease allows for easier bolt pull. It also works great on your cylinder guide rings and allows for easiest bolt pull without damaging your parts. It slows the wear down process. With that said, be sure to put a dab on the spring guide stopper and piston/trigger sears as well. Doing so will allow for smooth operation of your rifle.



-Foam in stock: By placing some foam in the stock, you can help quiet your rifle a bit. When the piston slams forward it makes a pretty noticeable sound. By adding some foam to your rifle stock, it dampens it a bit and allows for more stealth during field operations. It may not be super noticeable, but remember every bit counts.



These are just some of the mods that can be performed to your rifle, and are simple and effective ways to make your rifle perform better, while at the same time not burning a hole in your wallet.

Now that we have that covered, it is time to move along to your second set of upgrade purchases.
Upgrade 2: You have struggled thus far in regards to having the funds to purchase the upgrades necessary to build your rifle. Or maybe you have the money and are ordering both upgrade sets 1 and 2 in one complete order. Either way, the following parts are the ones that you should be looking to get after getting the first set. Remember, this is all personal preference, and is meant to be a guide. Don’t be afraid to do it a bit different, its up to you.

-Dangerwerx Hop Up Arm: This is probably the best upgrade you can get for the VSR 10 for the price. While the tag says $20 and you might be thinking why I would want to buy something so small for that big of a price, but in reality that is a small amount for what this piece is capable of. There are two types of dangerwerx hop up arms, both a Type A and a Type B. Both go according with certain buckings. The various styles of buckings work well with certain types of hop up arms. Be sure to look at the description and match up the bucking to the arm that works best for you. Overall, in short, this piece allows for even pressure on the bucking and is made of material stronger than plastic. It allows for more consistent shooting as well as more pressure on the hop up bucking. Before I ran the dangerwerx hop up arm, I was having trouble getting .4s out to 200 feet with a 430 fps spring. The hop up setting was nearly 100% and you could tell range was suffering due to lack of hop. However, once I stuck in the dangerwerx hop up arm, I was able to fling .4s out to past 200 feet on less than 35% hop up setting. That is a HUGE difference, and the increase in range and consistency was dramatic.

Look here for a review on the dangerwerx hop up arm: https://www.airsoftsniperforum.com/36...rwerx-arm.html

-Bucking: Depending on the type of dangerwerx hop up arm you go with, there are certain buckings that work better than others. I personally run a Type B arm with a firefly soft bucking and LOVE the results. I have run firefly softs for quite some time now and have never had one rip on me, and only ever replaced it one time (just to get some fresh parts in the rifle). I have used other ones such as the nineball, Devil A+, Modify, etc. but always went back to the firefly soft. Just had overall better results. Nothing super drastic but enough in game shooting where I was able to tell that the firefly was performing better than the others.

-Barrell: Like the buckings, you have a lot of options. A good 6.03mm barrel is ideal, but you have a lot of freedom here. I ran a Prometheus 6.03mm barrel in my old l96 and the quality of the barrel was great for the price. Don’t be afraid to get a longer barrel and add a suppressor. While not necessary, its an option you have. Keep in mind that if you run a G-Spec VSR 10 model, that the outer barrel blocks the inner barrel from fitting through it. So if you plan to extend your inner barrel in the G Spec to the end of the silencer, it would have to go through the outer barrel. To do this, some filing or sanding of the interior of the outer barrel is required. Just something to keep in mind.

Now that you have these three upgrades, your hop up unit is set up for success. These pieces are the key to success and by taking the time to carefully install them and check for anything out of place, it will ensure quality performance on the field. Any slight misalignment can cause your rifle to shoot like shit, and you will be wondering why you ever decided to upgrade your rifle in the first place. Just keep in mind that opening a rifle up and going to town on replacing parts can lead to issues and it takes some time to get acquainted with the interior. I can’t tell you how many mistakes I made along the way, and later in this guide, we will go over these so you do not have to for nearly as long as I did (and possibly avoid these situations altogether).

Upgrades 3: These are the upgrades where you purchase the remainder of what you don’t already have. While not required they certaintly are nice to have, and I would recommend getting them. Of course, if something goes wrong along the way, you may have already had to purchase one or two of these upgrades, but typically these are the ones that can hold off the longest.

-Spring guide: I ran a stock one for awhile, but the aftermarket one replaced it as soon as the funds were readily available. Keep in mind that there are 7mm and 9mm spring guides and depending on the size of your springs, they may or may not fit in the spring guide.

-Cylinder: A Teflon cylinder is one of the most worthwhile purchases. While not required, this cylinder makes bolt pull almost effortless. This is ideal for those of us running very high fps set ups, and need an extra bit of assistance when lying in the prone.

-Cylinder head: Can get a better seal with an aftermarket cylinder head, and usually these have less “nicks” and scrapes on the tip of the head, which allows for more consistent shooting and less damage to the bb when loading a round.


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Old 10-07-2014, 12:21 AM   #3
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Quote:
but if you are on a budget, you can look into a new sear set, including the trigger and piston sear. However, be cautious that while you are reinforcing the sears, the shell to the trigger box itself is plastic and is prone to cracking or breaking as well. There are aftermarket shells available, but I find that a new trigger box in general is worth the no hassle.
just read and found your misinformation. JG bar-10/G-spec now have metal trigger box, not plastic. Well L96/etc clones is plastic trigger box shells
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JG BAR-10 G-spec:

currently: all stock parts.

plan updrages:

Trigger: shs steel piston sears.
Spring: Element M145.
Inner: 430mm or 500mm depend on bb weight.....
Bucking: Lonex 70*, APS (FL built-in ), JG stock bucking.
Spring guide stopper: PPS steel.
Scope: Bushnell 2x6x28E.
and some plan DIY mods.
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Old 11-01-2014, 12:41 AM   #4
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Would this be a good upgrade lot: PDI 310 Spring
Laylax PSS10 Zero trigger with piston set
Firefly hop up
Laylax spring guide
Laylax damper cylinder head
Laylax Neo Piston
Laylax Teflon Cylinder
Laylax Aero chamber
Laylax Bolt Handle
Harris Bipod
Laylax 6.03 TBB
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Old 11-02-2014, 08:14 AM   #5
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why neo piston? xD you don't need it when taking a zerotrigger set + don't forget to take 11mm pdi spring instead of 13mm^^
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Old 11-02-2014, 11:43 AM   #6
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What spring do you recommend?
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Old 04-19-2015, 04:21 PM   #7
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Tokyo Marui Pro-sniper or Tokyo Marui G-SPEC

I am on the fence about either the Tokyo Marui Pro-sniper or Tokyo Marui G-SPEC what would you recommend.
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Old 04-19-2015, 05:58 PM   #8
ahp   ahp is offline
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Pro and take off the front site.
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Old 07-07-2015, 08:08 PM   #9
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Would the Top Dead Center mod (tdc) or shimming the hop up work better for a more accurate hop up system?
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Old 07-08-2015, 12:25 AM   #10
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I would reply "yes" but the forum says that message is too short.

Anyway, yes. The whole point of those mods is more consistent hop.
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Old 07-08-2015, 01:46 AM   #11
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TDC is good but you are better off with an Action Army Hopup Chamber. The hopup chamber has the TDC and a perfect air seal so it will be more accurate and should give higher fps.
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Advanced VSR Sniper Building Guide
https://www.airsoftsniperforum.com/showthread.php?t=6075
Advanced L96 Sniper Upgrade Guide
https://www.airsoftsniperforum.com/showthread.php?t=6465
Choosing the right spring and making it work
https://www.airsoftsniperforum.com/32...tml#post127126
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Old 03-14-2016, 10:42 AM   #12
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Newbie here.

Forget the huge barrel spacers, just a bit of plumbing tape round the end of the inner barrel so it doesn't rattle around inside the barrel end cap.

Forget plumbing tape round the cylinder head threads, YOU DON'T LOOSE ANY AIR THERE!, just a better fitting piston O ring or double up like I did or do whatever you can to get a better piston seal, this is where most air pressure is lost.

BB's veering off? Your hop up isn't centered. If you don't have a left right adjustable hop up simply look down the barrel from the hop up end and see which way its leaning and simply file down one of the hop up arm prongs until the bucking protrudes evenly into the top of the barrel.

My stock Well MB03 hits 520fps and fires straight till out of sight with these simple cheap mods.
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Old 03-14-2016, 10:59 AM   #13
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...also, going back to the piston seal, when the piston is drawn back (could just be my rifle) the piston O ring is visible through the slot on the cyclinder. This means the O ring gets pressed out slightly and when the piston goes forward when the rifle is fired the O ring gets torn/sliced on the sharp edge of the slot on the cyclinder!! All I did was take a half round needle file the chamfered/smoothed the inner edge of the slot in the cyclinder and hey presto no more torn O ring and piston compression lasts a million times longer!

Thank you, ill be here all week.
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:41 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richardmid1 View Post
Newbie here.

Forget the huge barrel spacers, just a bit of plumbing tape round the end of the inner barrel so it doesn't rattle around inside the barrel end cap.

Forget plumbing tape round the cylinder head threads, YOU DON'T LOOSE ANY AIR THERE!, just a better fitting piston O ring or double up like I did or do whatever you can to get a better piston seal, this is where most air pressure is lost.

BB's veering off? Your hop up isn't centered. If you don't have a left right adjustable hop up simply look down the barrel from the hop up end and see which way its leaning and simply file down one of the hop up arm prongs until the bucking protrudes evenly into the top of the barrel.

My stock Well MB03 hits 520fps and fires straight till out of sight with these simple cheap mods.
Are you joking? Or are you simply new?
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Old 03-15-2016, 02:57 PM   #15
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