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In the real steel side of things you will see a two stage trigger in the target rifles.

What it does is that it takes up the pull length. The first stage will take up a lot of the trigger pull, and then the second stage is going to usually be extremely light. You will be able to tell where it is at, and then when the triggers breaks with next to no force.
 

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I've found them useful for target shooting, but I would prefer a single stage trigger in airsoft.

When I've used a 2-stage I've pulled the first stage after lining up my shot, and then after I've pulled the first stage I check my sights again. If they're all good, I pull the second stage.
 

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MiloXC3 said:
I've found them useful for target shooting, but I would prefer a single stage trigger in airsoft.

When I've used a 2-stage I've pulled the first stage after lining up my shot, and then after I've pulled the first stage I check my sights again. If they're all good, I pull the second stage.
Since where on the topic of triggers and them changing pull weight, there is also Set Triggers. Most bench rifles and long range varmint rifles are fitted with them. After the action is cocked, you can either pull the trigger like normal, or give the trigger, pad, shoe, what ever (All depends on model) a forward push, and the trigger then resets to being only 1-4oz pull. Meaning if you blow on it hard enough it will literally go off.

But yes, near every firearm has some separate stage. Most noticeable ones are the WW2 bolt actions like the Lee-Enfield and Mauser's, when you pull them, there is a very noticeable slack point where the trigger almost just falls back to a easier 4-5lb pull.
 
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