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There is a lot of information out there about stalking, and fieldcraft, but each of us have our own ways of doing it. Whether you ambush, stalk, move with groups, or roll solo, there are tons of ways to get yourself into trouble.

Here is some information that will be covered.
-Moving alone Vs. Having a spotter/group
-Color blending
-Covering Ground
-Seasonal changes

Moving alone Vs. Having a spotter/group

No matter if you are a DM with a group, or lurking with just one spotter, you will end up alone at one point or another. You will become overwhelmed when you have 5 guys with AEG's moving in closely, but, you can learn to cope with that. It just depends on your ability to land shots, and move when necessary.
Sometimes being alone can be a positive thing depending on how many people you know you're up against. Flanking around solo will help with staying hidden, and you can move without having to worry about anything besides yourself. Being confident is key, there is no one else with you to help make decisions. You need to know your rifle really well and be sure about where its shooting. There is nothing worse than having to reload with guys charging, this is when you get up and evade as fast as you can. No one is there to cover you if you need reloading.
Being with a group of two or three is vital with a bolt action, concealment is key. But again, depending on how many people you are against and the terrain, it may be necessary to be in a squad of up to 7-10 as a designated marksman. There aren't too many downsides to being with an effective group, but you will see direct action, concealment is only needed minimally. Enemy will see you easier as you need to advance with the herd.

Color Blending

Every type of terrain has a basic base coat, some are sandy, and some have ferns covering the soil ground. Its important to prepare your suit and rifle with elastic loops to fill with natural vegetation. Being aware of what colors that are around you is very important when trying to get away, and for getting in closer. When on your feet, be conscious of the colors behind you, and avoid creating black spots for enemy to spot easily. You can keep mental images of what the playing fields natural colors are when painting your rifle and coloring your suit.

Covering Ground

When in need of evasion or while stalking, keeping an eye on whats far ahead is the most important thing. Keeping your eyes up while walking through a forest is a skill that needs to be learned. If you're walking into an ambush, you won't be able to see slight movements that would trigger a mental alarm. I've been severely lit up because I was too busy jumping logs and then ran right into three guys.
Don't move too quick when stalking, slow movements are less likely to be picked up by the human eye. Also if not crouched, stay as vertical as you can, deer are easily seen in woods because they stand horizontally, with a mostly vertical background.

Seasonal Changes
Keeping up to date with seasonal changes helps avoiding troubles when fielding your rifle next time, hopup adjustments need to be done with different temperature changes, especially with gas rifles. Depending if you live somewhere where its mainly dry vegetation you wont have to make much changes besides regular hop adjustments. But if you live in the Midwest, the weather changes to different colors several times a year.
Starting with Spring, things still aren't too green, you will want a light and dark brown base coat with green overlay. Moving into Summer you will want a tan base, with a light green and light brown overlay. Remember nature doesn't have a pattern, so keep it natural. Fall you will still want a tan and light brown base, with coyote brown overlay. You can even use small hints of foreign colors, like orange, violet, or maroon. Violets are good for dusk and night time. Winter is obviously an alpine white base, with the smallest amount of dark brown hidden in.

This is just baseline information, a lot can be obtained by critical thinking. Just think about what is practical, not what looks cool or what wont get you laughed at. Knowing where you rifle shoots is all that matters, then from there you move on to making that only a tool to your concealment.
 

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I've been able to stay concealed in the snoww both with or without one. I find it much easier to blend in as there is more consistency in color(white/grey) I know at a field I play at in the winter tall grass becomes brown clumps sticking out of snow banks, and by simple taking a white painter's suit, cutting some slits in it, and adding some brown vegitation, my spotter and I were able to disappear into the ground, we literally had some people walk less than 25 feet from us, look at as, then move on. So in the past I have found I prefer ghille-less in the snow, just with some good apparel.

On the other hand, both brown and white ghilles can be quite effective. White is good if you plan on staying on the ground, but if you plan on kneeling in the branches of a fallen tree or somthing similar, you want brown, because thats the color that will be around you the most.

Here are some pictures from one of the most sniper-heavy winter games I've been to. This was about 3 years ago I think, and I do believe most of these are of other members on here.

White:




Brown:





Both are your friend!


Hope this helped,
Yankee
 

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Yankee, those are some really nice pictures. I have been debating making a winter ghillie, mainly because its not everyday that there are games in the snow. However, it looks badass, and those pictures are persuading me towards making one.

I remember seeing these on the forum before. Is it mirage, Mosin, and Oakey?
 

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Those are all pictures of shooters in team RAGE. Mirage being the white suited fellow (spent 4 hours tying knots of white t shirt scrap and towel pieces) and the brown ghillie suit is mine, oaken borrowed it for the pics you see with the vsr however the last picture is both Mirage and I walking in the garage. Brown suit is more concealment at a distance. White suit can help get upclose and personal, but more often then not is only for the prone shooting platform.
 

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shellshockww3 said:
Jest remember win in low to high vegetation use whats 8 inches above your back dont use stuff on the ground and win going into a new area you may need to adjust you ghillie to the new colors or to jest keep stuff looking nice.
Cannot understand a thing you just said. ???

You already have one warning because of another post, and I am letting this slide. But please make sure to post to our standards in the future.
 

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Being the Hunter

I live in the midwest, so this post is incredibly helpful to me. Thank you.
I live in Kansas, and in the past, I have had a hard time with using the proper colors of the season. I finally just bought a dark green ghille suit to hide in juniper trees, since they never really change color.>:D Right now, I run in a squad of six, so I haven't really had to worry about camo problems.
 

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I never run with someone else. and everytime i do i die. it ruins my play style.

As for concealment, its often the WAY you move and not what your wearing that is important. Of course full body camoflouge is a must. especially if your white:)

Just remember sticks arent white there brown. Im not racist please to take this that way.

thanks
hydra
 
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