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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Everything's crazy. There's a complicated story that I'll leave out, but long story short is I am potentially building a VSR out of absolutely nowhere.
I hate to be this guy, asking people to do my work for me, but it's time sensitive- figuring out the costs of the build. Also, I've had a tremendous amount of help from Careful, have been researching my arse off for the entire day, and through proximity [being deep into sniping for years, with a Tanaka] actually have a fair base line understanding of VSR builds.
My main issue is that I know nothing about the gas conversion kits I'd be choosing from, and how choosing one or the other affects established upgrade parts.

I already have a barrel <460mm in length (which will be paired with a custom outer barrel- undetermined length for both), and a Maple Leaf Diamond 70 degree.

Can anyone provide information on the fitting of the outer barrel to the receiver? I'd like to know thread dimensions, outer diameter, and any location of screw holes / etc. in relation to the receiver end of the barrel.

What is wrong with this picture:
JG BAR-10
[either] Wolverine BOLT, BOLT cylinder
[or] Mancraft SDIK
Action Army chamber
Maple Leaf concave nub

I'm looking for a comprehensive build- down to minor parts prone to breaking and mods I should look into (no need to explain them, I'll do my research- I'm already being a pain enough).
 

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I'd opt for the bolt rather than the mancraft with a short barrel. The mancraft is overvolumed so inefficient with the short barrel. The bolt is supposedly better :tup:

You may also want to look in a softer ML, 60 degrees is what I personally like best nowadays. It's slightly more accurate than 70 degrees :hehe:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'd opt for the bolt rather than the mancraft with a short barrel. The mancraft is overvolumed so inefficient with the short barrel. The bolt is supposedly better :tup:

You may also want to look in a softer ML, 60 degrees is what I personally like best nowadays. It's slightly more accurate than 70 degrees :hehe:
Thanks, I thought that was the case with the SDIK- and the BOLT is looking quite attractive- being able to dial in volume so nicely.

I read your post and watched your video on that matter- it did indeed make me consider going with a 60...we'll see. I do already own a 70, so it makes it a bit hard to rationalize.

Also, what about the trigger area of things? I always heard a zero trigger was necessary (and Mancraft's SDIK depends on your use of either 45 or 0...trigger things) in spring builds- does it apply to the BOLT, or matter at all for performance with the SDIK?
 

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Can anyone provide information on the fitting of the outer barrel to the receiver? I'd like to know thread dimensions, outer diameter, and any location of screw holes / etc. in relation to the receiver end of the barrel.
27mm ID 30mm OD
thread pattern is 30x1.0mm

Screw holes are largely unnecessary aside from the one to fit the hopup unit. That one is located approximately 150mm from the front of the receiver but I'll get the exact measurement for you.
 

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The mancraft offers the option to work with either the 45 degree or the 90 degree one. You don't need a 90 degree setup since there's no big spring in it but it's nice to have the feature, especially if you already have a 90 degree trigger or want to swap back and forth to a spring for whatever reason.

But I wouldn't know how it work on the bolt, sorry :shrug:

I'd say it's not necessary though. The reason why we use 90 degree triggers in springers is because of the sheer force involved on the trigger. Not really the case with either of the HPA conversion kits :hehe:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The mancraft offers the option to work with either the 45 degree or the 90 degree one. You don't need a 90 degree setup since there's no big spring in it but it's nice to have the feature, especially if you already have a 90 degree trigger or want to swap back and forth to a spring for whatever reason.

But I wouldn't know how it work on the bolt, sorry :shrug:

I'd say it's not necessary though. The reason why we use 90 degree triggers in springers is because of the sheer force involved on the trigger. Not really the case with either of the HPA conversion kits :hehe:
Is there some other aspect of a 90 degree trigger sear that's desirable other than durability- a crisper trigger pull or something? I can't find a good diagram of what the two sears do differently.

I'm assuming Wolverine's BOLT works with the 45 degree, if not the 90- as they claim it's compatible with the stock rifle.
 

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Is there some other aspect of a 90 degree trigger sear that's desirable other than durability- a crisper trigger pull or something? I can't find a good diagram of what the two sears do differently.

I'm assuming Wolverine's BOLT works with the 45 degree, if not the 90- as they claim it's compatible with the stock rifle.
The 90º unit is the only real option for a high power spring rifle. Its design is far more effective at holding and releasing the piston than a 45º unit.

The BOLT does not need a functioning trigger sear set, it operates via a microswitch so the housing and trigger are only there for the sake of convenience. Otherwise you could put the trigger anywhere on the gun if you wanted to.
 

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The BOLT does not need a functioning trigger sear set, it operates via a microswitch so the housing and trigger are only there for the sake of convenience. Otherwise you could put the trigger anywhere on the gun if you wanted to.
Interesting. Then you don't need the 90 degree one, no.

The 90 degree trigger does offer some more advantages in spring guns. It has a much better trigger pull. It's crisp, like a real gun, whereas a 45 degree trigger just feels awful. It also has a much a smoother bolt return (because there is no piston being pressed against the cylinder).

But the crisp trigger pull is the result of the force on the sears which results in friction. Two surfaces static to each other have a higher amount of friction than two surface moving against each other, so you need a certain amount of force to get the mechanism moving, but once it's moving, the force required to keep it moving is lower, so once you've applied that initial force, it feels like it "breaks", which feels like a real gun.

If there is no big force applied to the sear however, there is no friction, so that doesn't work and it feels the same as a 45 degree trigger :hehe:

The bolt return also doesn't really matter here because there is no powerful spring pressing the piston against the cylinder so that's not an issue either :tup:

So I would say the only application of 90 degree triggers is in spring guns. They are pretty useless in converted rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The 90º unit is the only real option for a high power spring rifle. Its design is far more effective at holding and releasing the piston than a 45º unit.

The BOLT does not need a functioning trigger sear set, it operates via a microswitch so the housing and trigger are only there for the sake of convenience. Otherwise you could put the trigger anywhere on the gun if you wanted to.
I really should have come to that conclusion having watched the BOLT video where he shows the switch which causes the firing mechanism to engage...:doh: heh

So...are there no other relevant aftermarket parts? I suppose that's not so surprising for a $200+ conversion kit which replaces a ton of durability-oriented parts related to the power behind a sniper rifle spring...
 
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