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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the differences between the degrees in the hop up (50° 60° 70° ecc) in termes of:
  1. bb weight?
  2. range?
  3. Power in Joule lost when hop up is activated?
I don't know if this question was already done but I've not found anything regarding this so I asked, hope that is the right section.
 

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Bucking degrees should be selected based on the velocity of the traveling bb, not the weight as many others often incorrectly conclude. This is because the application of backspin from a hop up is based more on the initial velocity more than anything else.

Having said that, use the following chart:

Secondly, you should select the target velocity based on a couple of factors:
What Joule you want your replica to shoot at
The heaviest bb your replica can actually hop (lower end replica setup may not even be able to able to hop .30, where as many snipers try to use .43+ bb)

Range is a function of your joule rating and the hopup backspin, no one here can give you an exact number. Expect about 50 meters for AEG and upwards of 75-100 meters for sniper based platforms (anything beyond that and you’re lobbing the bb in an arch to the other side or you have backwind in your favor – too many people have unrealistic expectation on the range for their replicas).

Also no one can share with you the exact joule lost because it’s not a flat number, it’s more a fraction. For example, I used 60 degree MRhop 2020 maple leaf bucking on my AEG, my Joule goes from 1.72 to around 1.62 at the appropriate hop (.32). I happen to use the same bucking on my BASR and my Joules on that goes from 3.2 to 2.85 at the appropriate hop (on .45)
 

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What are the differences between the degrees
The difference is in the hardness of the material of each bucking. The softer is 40, the hardest, I've seen, is 85.
Higher you go in number the harder the rubber is. You choose the hardness based on the exit velocity of the bb you are using, no matter the bb's weight.
In general the 70 and above hardness bucking are for high energy rifles, shooting heavy bbs, resulting more range. Keep in mind that there are players with pistols ~300ft/s using heavy bbs...
 

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Buckings will be advertised with certain degrees to be used for certain outputs. I’ve read that is a myth though. Not entirely sure it matters all that much. Think about a softer bucking but playing in the winter. It wouldn’t be as soft as a hot summer day. Not everyone plays year round with drastic climate changes, but it’s just an example. They say softer buckings can be “grippier” which may be something you want with hop application. Idk. To each and their own. For my bucking guns I usually run a Maple Leaf Diamond 60° all year round.
 

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Bucking hardness is seriously underrated, as running a 50° will usually suck unless you want to hop a .50g BB at like 1J, which isn't a good idea in itself.
70° is the standard, for good reason, it's good.
I don't recommend that you go below 70° unless you're using a shitty and rough barrel and struggling to get hop, as you don't get any other benefits except being part of the soft gang.
Soft buckings also wear out faster, which sucks.

The 2021 series buckings are made of a silicone alloy which is resistant to temperature (-300°F +400°F) so you can probably rock an 80° during the winter months, and you also get the benefit of better wear resistance due to silicone being a shit ton better than mystery rubber.

For reference, a 70° 2021 grips like the old 50°, and the 85° 2021 grips like the old 70° Maple Leaf.
As for other buckings, I don't like other buckings unless I'm doing R-hop, in which case I pick something hard as to get better lifespan and airseal.

The whole FPS/° thing is sorta true, but only to a point, more like 80° and below for 1.5J - and 70° and above for 1.5J+.

As for Blind Sniper's choice of the 60° Diamond, that's about a 70°-75° 2021 from my experiences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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Its normally the fps/mps your choosen weight fires at, however with the 2021 silicone ML hop rubbers they grip the BB more than the old rubber compound.
 

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@mrFonzie
You’re confounding slightly different ideas

The various spring rating, be it the m or sp system, is just an estimate of what a bb’s exit velocity is out of the barrel (.20 for m and .25 for sp system). At the end of the day, it is just an estimate. There are a lot of other variables involved with what the actual exit velocity will be. Things such as how good your air compression is, the length of your barrel, or even the type of gearbox you’re using. So the only way to know your actual exit velocity requires you to use a chronograph. Any half way serious tech should own a chronograph.

As far as the velocity my image is quoting, that is the actual velocity for the joule rating you want. You can look up a chart online. But most of us know the various standard joule cutoffs, like for .25, 400 ft/s is 1.86 joules. After you know which joule you’re aiming for, in your case, 1J, you check based on your bb weight and the velocity that it should be exiting at. So for example, on .32 bb on 1J, you should have an exit velocity of 260ft/s or 79m/s. Which indicates you should be using at 50 degree bucking
 
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