Airsoft Sniper Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
after reading a few stories in the "What's more important to you, your gun or your tactics?" thread it got me thinking, what is everyone's story for how they learned to be stealth?

For me it was when i was first starting out airsoft ~11 years ago, I was about 12 years old, got my first TM M16A2. which I broke in about 2 months.... I tried to fix it but at that age I did not really know what I was doing and it stayed broken. This left me to borrow a friends KWA glock 26 with a single magazine for around 6 months till i got a new rifle. having only a pistol with ~25 rounds against AEG's with a few hicaps really teaches you to be a sure shot, and how to sneak into your range without be seen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
That sounds like a really interesting way to learn! (a painful one too) I suppose I 'learnt', by having family and relatives in the armed forces, 'show/teach' me stuff they have picked up. I believe people learn it in different ways really, it depends on what experiences you have and how you want to go about it. I'd say the best really is learning it by experience as this way you can learn from your mistakes and constantly alter to refine your skills while taking notes about the do's and don'ts.

Zero
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
For me it's probably working out why you were shot in game. How and why you were seen and how can you avoid it. Experience is the best way to learn. That's why I like playing against high fps guns. As when your shot it's not just "hit..." carry on. It's more like "fook me that hurt! Won't be doing that again"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
Stealth? Yeah I'm still working on that. We play a lot in our town so its really CQC oriented. We did do a sniper hunt with the two DMR's (myself and a buddy) against everyone else. We were separated and he was going to draw fire and I was going to ambush, but that failed and I had to move really fast. They heard me move but had no idea where I really was.

Stealth and tactics, very important. I'm always learning though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,311 Posts
Practice, practice and more practice.

The more you get out there and try it, the better you get. No other way to do it.

Especially because every field is different. For example, on my field, a full ghillie is a detriment because nothing on the field looks anything like a ghillie suit. It's a lot of trees and some ferns, but no real underbrush and bushes. It all just comes down to going out there and trying stuff out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I've learned over time by fixing my mistakes I made in games. To be honest when I first started I was one of the worst on the field. I felt nothing like a sniper, just a player with a BASR. It was then that I realized I'd need a lot more practice. Now I'm not so bad anymore and a lot of people compliment me now, still I can never have enough practice. I'd say I learned stealth from practice, experience and other people.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,094 Posts
I was playing guns as a little kid in the woods all the time with my brothers and buddies. We had all sorts of gear way before we found airsoft 12 years ago. I also spent most of my life in Martial arts and Kickboxing so I was your average ninja kid back in the day,lol.. So when me and the other kids would go tromping in the woods I would jump out of nowhere with a goofy homemade ninja suit and toy swords etc... When we started playing airsoft in the late late "99" I went straight to a bolt action rifle, when the others picked out assualt rifles, I rocked a bolty. 12 years later its like first nature to be sneaky and stealthy.me and the kid play silent sneak up all the time here at home. I might slow crawl up the steps just to get as close as I can before I scream and make the kids poo their pants,hahaha.. And the same goes for my boy, he will sneak down the steps and come up behind be while I'm doing dishes. I admit he's getting pretty good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I learned most of it from when I was in the military. Started off from my time playing guns as a kid and grew up with my Dad who was a CF Airborne Regiment member. It carried over to my career where I continued to learn and now I carry it on with airsoft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
Like Ranger, I also spent my childhood learning martial arts, so I learned a lot about moving quickly and quietly from that. Also, as a kid and into video games and paintball, I always played a long range support role, so transferring all of that to become a sniper and staying hidden was easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,193 Posts
Stealth...let me see. I learned stealth from martial arts and being heavily interested in the military from an early age, particalurly with Special Forces and Snipers. I loved the way they spent their time behind enemy lines, hiding in hide sites so close to the enemy that patrols would almost walk over them and yet never saw them. As a result of this when I was a lot younger, I spent a lot of my free time out in the woods with cheap cammies and binos hiding from people walking. The biggest challenge was dogs. Sometimes they would stop for a while with their dogs and rest or chat to someone. This taught me to move and stay really quiet and most importantly, be very patient. I suppose that this then carried over to airsoft. however, airsoft adds a new element to it as if the people find you, they shoot you. For me, it is much like what the Special Forces and Snipers did so I think that is the reason I love airsoft and being a sniper. More recently, I have also being using a US Army sniper training manual to teach me how US snipers do it. It's all about practice. Thats my story on how I learned stealth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Well oderfa, they are right somewhat in a certain way.

I'll be talking about "being good" as being effective on the field. Being effective for airsoft requires two main things that I'm aware. One is skill. The other is equipment. Both things' effectiveness can be increased.

Equipment's effectiveness is increased by sinking money and likely some time into teching. This multiplies your effectiveness in a fast manner. However, the lack of expendable cash and limitations of airsoft technology makes this pathway have an effectiveness ceiling.

Now while training/practicing your airsoft skills is a much more gradual improvement, there's always more to improve on, allowing someone to be as skilled as much as they can devote their time to airsofting.

While the player that drops a lot of money will be somewhat effective instantly as range + accuracy is vital in airsoft, the player who focuses on skills will be better over time.

Sorry if that got a bit rambly there.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top