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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen many snipers who see a target that is way out of range, and think, "Well, they wont hear me so I'll try and see if I can hit them from here." They take aim, and fire...and miss. They repeat this several times...but they still miss. On the fourth shot, the sniper's bb hits a tree a few feet away from his target. The enemy hears it, ducks, and moves away.

Not only did you lose your chance to take the enemy down, but you just lost that element of fear or respect that they had for you as a sniper. They now think of a sniper as 'the guy that cant hit anything.' That is dangerous for you the sniper.

A large part of a snipers effectiveness is 'all in your enemie's heads.' Rightly so. But you must give them a reason to fear you. I saw it posted somewhere that the scary thing about going up against a well seasoned sniper is that you cant see him. You only find out that one is in the area after you have been hit, it's already over.

If the enemy knows that you will do something really stupid and give yourself away, then why the heck? They will just wait for that dumb mistake.

The point is, always make sure that you can hit them with the first shot when you fire. It is better to let them come 10 yards closer if you are uncertain that you can make the kill, than to miss (and possibly give away your position) because you wanted to be able to bragg on the best shot of the day.


Correct tactics keeps the sniper effective and in the game. ;)
 

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There are a couple things that I disagree with. If you have to shoot 3 times to hit the target, and you still don't hit him/her, you are doing it wrong. You should, as you said, wait for them to get closer. Secondly, a shot to a tree or something near you is just as nerve wracking as you being shot yourself. That kind of suppressive fire is great when a sniper is trying to hold down a fire team/squad so that his own team can get there. I don't believe that it diminishes the sniper in any way - they were just trying to suppress until their team could get there, right? ;)
 

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There are two separate types of fire, effective and ineffective. A little example of ineffective would be a guy with an AEG shooting almost in the sky and trying to rain the bb's down on you. Not really actually hitting you, but it will keep you down if they're close.

Then there is effective, this is the type of style we go for. It's one or two shots before you hit your target, the enemy knows your there and knows that if they move they'll be done for. A good example of this is in the book "93 Confirmed", a true story of former GYSGT Carlos Hathcock, in which him and his spotter effectively pinned an entire platoon sized force of NVA for 48 hours straight, only firing when the enemy exposed themselves, and forcing them to stay pinned down until they ultimately ended up losing around 30 of their men, and surrendered to grunt USMC troops that swept through a few days later.

Ultimately in Airsoft this is what we're striving for. As Airsoft snipers our main job is not to deliver effective firepower, but to observe and report what we see. A sniper in the real world will maybe only shoot two or three shots in their lifetime career, but they do count, as you've pointed out.

I recall a game in which I was in a well enforced hide with my Sniper, Livonia. We had single handedly pinned down about 12 airsofters from a certain other team and eventually after Livonia and I had relocated without them knowing they were still hiding behind cover trying to figure out how to move, until they were engaged by our assault element of our team and eventually removed from the equation.

Airsoft is not as consistent as a real steel rifle, you can't just enter in the numbers for distance/wind and elevation and instantly put your bb on target, this is where those misses can occur. Just something you have to take with the job but ultimately as you attend more games you'll learn how to become better with your rifle and almost become one with it, knowing how it shoots in different environments.

-Mosin
 

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Could not agree more Mosin.

Heck, I have had games where I did not take a shot, but instead, acted as the "eyes" for my team. During a small game, my spotter and I headed up towards a hill, and set up shop, about 1200 feet from where most of the fighting would take place. Turns out, for the next two hours or so, we simply scanned the field, and reported to our team members what was going on, where the enemy was, etc. etc. At one point, a guy from both our team and the opposing team were about twenty five feet away from eachother, but neither knew/could see that the other person was there. But being able to communicate with my team, I was able to radio down to him, giving our guy the advantage.

Meanwhile, the opposing team, having no clue where my spotter and I were, were worried about getting pinned/fired upon. After the game, as we talked, one of the guys said how they literally laid down some fire on a bush/tree for around 10-15 minutes, thinking they saw us. This kind of "fear" can seriously effect the opposing team's performance, even if the sniper team does not take a single shot all game.

That is my favorite part of sniping. Being able to set up a hide, and communicate with my team, giving us the advantage on the field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Right. I agree with the other posts. What I mean, however, is a sniper who is trying to take out the other guy, but foolishly takes shoots way early...not letting the target get close enough...is blowing his cover. If the other guy was paying attention, the hit to the tree might tell where the shot came from, and you had better scram, he will be right back with his buddies. If he was not paying attention, you got lucky, but move anyway. And the story of the guy that was shooting at a bush that looked like a sniper is a good example of what I'm talking about. If you prove yourself to be an idiot, always showing yourself, then you lose that respect that they have for you. They will say, "Just wait a few minutes, he will do something stupid and we will know where he is." A good way to get that reputation is to shoot too early and only hit 25% of the time.

I agree that there are times when it is good to show yourself, the enemy will get down really low...for some odd reason. Haha.

My point was also, that in the situation of TRYING TO TAKE OUT THE BAD GUY you must never fire too early, you will blow your cover. I dont know about you, but I can usually tell when someone is trying to pin me down, or if they are just taking pot shots.

I guess I covered a broad topic, I hope this clears it up a little. :)
 

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Yup definitely don't shoot too early. Aside from not being able to take the guy out, waiting to shoot is also something a sniper / DMR needs to learn.

My experience is that in one game at which I killed guys as soon as they popped their heads up. If I had waited abit more, he and his teammates would have walked closer and my team would have been able to finish them off in one swoop.

But like everyone's saying, in airsoft particularly, we're used more as long range suppression.
 
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