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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
When in the middle of a game it can be a real pain when you realise your scope is not aimed right at the target. If you have a good expensive scope it will have turrets that you just turn and then it is fixed. If you have a cheap scope you will need to unscrew the cap off, then get out a screw driver and adjust where the cross hairs are aiming, then fire the gun to check if it is on target. This can take a lot of time.
In airsoft you are best with a scope with adjustable turrets. This tutorial will show you how to make that cheap scope into a good scope with adjustable turrets.


First, take the caps off and screw the adjusters all the way in.


Next, if your scope has a plastic adjuster, unscrew it off and also take off the aluminium plate that tells you what direction to turn to adjust the scope. Then put the screws ¾'s of the way back in. (This gives the bonding agent something extra to grip onto.
The screws are not 100% necessary as the bonding agent will still stick to the metal really well anyway.


The next step is to join the cap onto the adjuster turret with some type of clay bonding agent. I normally do this in two steps.
So role some type of clay bonding agent into a ball. I recommend "NEED IT" or "JB WELD". Push the ball flat onto the turret and make sure that it only touches the brass piece and not the outside part that does not move. This clay is to bond to the turret only and not onto the cap when it is screwed on. So, screw on the cap to make sure it is not touching the clay when fully in and then take the cap off again. Then let the clay bonding agent harden for 20 minutes.


Step two in joining the cap to the turret is to make another ball and flatten it onto the clay that is already hardened onto the turret. This ball needs to be smaller than the first ball but it needs to have enough clay that it touches the cap when the cap is fully screwed onto the turret. You want as much of the clay as possible to touch the cap as this will mean a stronger bond to the cap but you do not want too much clay that it overflows onto the outer case of the turret as this will make the turret impossible to rotate. Let this harden for 20 minutes.



Now all you need to do is glue onto the cap, the plate that says what direction to turn the turret for adjustments.


Finally unscrew the turret as it is fully screwed in. Then sight your gun in and then you are finished. You will notice that when you turn the caps, they will have the little clicking sound that you previously heard when adjusting the turrets and you can now alter your scope with very little effort.
 

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I've gone ahead and built off of what 1tonne has started here with the quick adjustment knobs for a cheap scope, utilizing a 3D printer and being applicable to a slightly different design of Windage/Elevation knobs.

My scope is a CVLife 3-9x40, cheap as they get, and has windage and elevation adjustment that requires the use of a screwdriver (Image 1). These slots have approximate dimensions of 1.4mmx8.05mm, and are what the 3D printable turrets are designed to fit into.

After sanding/painting and fitting, I went ahead and JB-Welded them directly to the adjustment knobs. The slots aid in centering on the knob and help with holding it on, but may not be fully necessary. Once cured, the only play in the turrets is from the knobs themselves.

You can find and print the part from the Thingiverse page: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4683691

Image 3 is of various versions of prints, however I decided to keep it simple.
 

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I've always just whipped the caps off and used them to turn the turret screws, they nearly always fit.
 
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