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Two days ago, I was doing a little skirmish with a couple of friends when suddenly my environment became my enemy. It was around 6:00 in the evening, and the sun was shining towards me, with my back to one edge of the field and looking inwards, with my opponents in the direction of the sun. This created a very difficult situation for my visibility, and I had no opportunity to change my orientation relative to the sun to change that situation. Later, we played into dusk, which provided a similar environment, and again I was left on the wrong side of the light being cast. We continued into the night, at which point the moonlight cast a faint light over the field, and abundant shadows.

This day made me wonder how to take disadvantageous lighting and turn it in your favor. How do you guys deal with it? I figured that covering the space between my face and my scope would solve the visibility while aiming problem, but night fighting and dusk fighting visibility is a different story.

How do you fight with light?
 

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I try to move with the shadows of swaying trees and bushes. Cover up anything shiny on you or your rifle too to stop anything shining (duuhh!)
 

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Actually, light can be your friend too. I was in a forest on a KotH game. Since the structure was all make-shift, they made a rule about no vaulting the walls; only coming through the paths. it is a specialty of mine, so I asked if I may tunnel under it. Got the green light.

The sun was high and dappled and brilliant through the canopy in little specs. I happen to have a dappled camoflauge, so, I high-crawled into along the side off a road in the trees, belly--crept the last 30 yards. Tthe whole time I kept my face in the dirt, so my goggles could not glint, and I had grass and flowers on my helmet, which I took from the roadside. When I stood and called to attack, I appeared to the man guarding the hill to simply rise from the ground before him.

But, that is dappled light. Large floodings of light are dangerous. Generally I try not to let more than half my body into one if I can avoid it.

And, that is another thing: remember that your goggles will glint very easily. A brim or scrim should do the trick.
 

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If your problem is seeing them when you are facing the sun, what I do is I made a rifle wrap, or maybe a rifle ghillie is a better term for it, where it resembles a ghillie blanket that I drape over my scope and secure it using rubber bands. When I go to look through the scope, there is a foot of extra ghillie blanket I left unsecured that I folded back over the scope, so I take the extra ghillie and drape it over my head to block out all light besides the scope, and it hides my face to create a full ghillie effect when prone. If I am not facong the sun I normally don't use that method however.
 

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The battlefield advantage of having the sun at your back is one of those maxims like having the higher ground, always leaving an escape route for your enemy to take, etc. :) And for good reason!

I ALWAYS take light and it's effects into consideration when I play as a CO role etc. Yesterday, went to a game in the crazy Alabama heat and sunlight (super bright, 105 degrees ambient, God knows what adjusted for heat index), and I had my squad holding a position near a road with dense forest on all sides, and all throughout the day we would orient as the sun came down.

A few weeks ago on a related note, we played a night game in a local park, with a varying degrees of concealment, lighting (light posts, but some very dark areas, etc)- and one of the people on the opposing team had a strobe light on his AEG- I was amazed at how effective that unit was at disrupting your sight, even at a distance! Sure, it gave away his general position- but it was impossible to see exactly where he was standing!
 

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. . .

A few weeks ago on a related note, we played a night game in a local park, with a varying degrees of concealment, lighting (light posts, but some very dark areas, etc)- and one of the people on the opposing team had a strobe light on his AEG- I was amazed at how effective that unit was at disrupting your sight, even at a distance! Sure, it gave away his general position- but it was impossible to see exactly where he was standing!
We have a method for that here: obscure the light with the muzzle. Lower the muzzle slowly. When they light comes back, the gun is on target, or as on target as we can hope.
 
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