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So now that I my gun fixed and I can start thinking about its future, UTG l96, I would like to ask two questions. Would it be better or easier to start upgrading my clone starting with Hop-up/Barrel then move on to the cylinder etc. Or to buy a Maruzen and upgrade it slower, due to its high price.

Second, what kind of lube or polish should I use for my barrel and cylinder (all the moving parts)? There is most likely a thread on this I just don't see one. (If you could just direct me that would be great)
 

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For cylinder: White lithium grease--Can get at Home Depot, True Value, Etc. Woogie suggested this to me and I love the stuff. Works great, is cheap, and will last me a lifetime.

As for upgrading, the hop up area is a good place to start. Who knows when the stock bucking will break, and rather than snooping for a replacement piece, just get a new, higher quality chamber, bucking and a new barrel.

Then save the cash for some durability parts so that your rifle will hold up longer. That is the route I took with my rifle, with the exception that I purchased a few hop up upgrades along with a few pieces to the cylinder unit.

So basically, stick with your UTG and upgrade from there.
 

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I used to use the P Force silicon oil, but switched over to lithium grease as I use it on all the cylinder parts.

The power "stuff" is basically just the spring. But in order to be able to use a more powerful spring, durability upgrades, such as the parts inside the cylinder unit, are necessary.

-Spring Guide
-Piston/Piston head
-Cylinder head
-Cylinder itself

That is the inside of the cylinder unit, minus the spring. The spring guide and piston are two areas that will be more likely to break than the others. However, I eventually replaced the cylinder head as well, but am still using the stock cylinder itself to this day.
 

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The only thing you need to be careful of is "over greasing" which is a major problem with the White Lithium Grease. It's really sticky, (also good for gears so you don't get grease flung everywhere), but if you put too much, it will get shot out the air nozzle, right into your Hop-up, causing big problems. Then it will get tracked by BB's into the inner barrel, causing really bad shots. It's a very good grease though, and I use it exclusively for GB work, just don't use too much!
 

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Just use your hands. Li grease is fine, assuming the stuff you get is biodegradeable, just put about 1 mL of grease on the cylinder, and rub it all over. I would put some on the parts in the cylinder too, just not on the piston head or the cylinder head - make sure NO GREASE TOUCHES THOSE!!!!!!!!!!!1!1!!1one!!!!one!!11!
 

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Cheese Man said:
Just use your hands. Li grease is fine, assuming the stuff you get is biodegradeable, just put about 1 mL of grease on the cylinder, and rub it all over. I would put some on the parts in the cylinder too, just not on the piston head or the cylinder head - make sure NO GREASE TOUCHES THOSE!!!!!!!!!!!1!1!!1one!!!!one!!11!
I always put some on the cylinder head and piston head. Is there any reason not to?

Reason being, stock piston head and cylinder head come lathered in grease. When you wipe all this down, adding the lithium grease helps with air seal. The grease on the cylinder parts stock are replaced by lithium grease. I do not see a harm in it. But if you have some good reasons, I am all ears....or eyes.
 

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Cheese Man said:
Just use your hands. Li grease is fine, assuming the stuff you get is biodegradeable, just put about 1 mL of grease on the cylinder, and rub it all over. I would put some on the parts in the cylinder too, just not on the piston head or the cylinder head - make sure NO GREASE TOUCHES THOSE!!!!!!!!!!!1!1!!1one!!!!one!!11!
Why? Is there any reason for that? First off, when you grease the cylinder, some grease is going to touch the cylinder head (or at least the oring) and is most likely going to be tracked to the head. But this isn't a bad thing. Grease works the best in getting a consistent airseal and helps orings have a long life. In other words, it is needed to have a good seal, so grease those parts!

Have you ever worked on a gun before? Or are you just confused because you should do some research before you spout off like that.
 

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Maybe the caps was a little over the top, but what I meant was that you should not get any grease onto the inside of the cylinder head, or the front of the piston head, some will get shot into the bucking, and then your shots consistently under-hop. Basically, anything that would give the grease an inlet into the hopup should not be greased, i.e. no grease on the inside hole of the cylinder head, no grease on the very front of the piston, no grease on the nozzle of the cylinder head, etc.

I have worked on guns before, thanks. I have built 3 of mine, and at least 6-7 of my friends', so I feel like I have some sufficient experience in this.
 

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Cheese Man said:
Maybe the caps was a little over the top, but what I meant was that you should not get any grease onto the inside of the cylinder head, or the front of the piston head, some will get shot into the bucking, and then your shots consistently under-hop. Basically, anything that would give the grease an inlet into the hopup should not be greased, i.e. no grease on the inside hole of the cylinder head, no grease on the very front of the piston, no grease on the nozzle of the cylinder head, etc.

I have worked on guns before, thanks. I have built 3 of mine, and at least 6-7 of my friends', so I feel like I have some sufficient experience in this.
Nahh... just the thousand "!" marks.


But anyways, you do have a valid point, but one I'm not too sure is accurate. When you are greasing, it's impossible not to get any into the bucking, or at least shot into the bucking. Also, you can get around this by not greasing any compression parts, but then you will have a terrible seal. No way around that.

Also, having a bone dry hop makes your hop very prone to ripping, especially if you have a decent spring in your gun. If you play in humid climates, or are ok with using a cheap(er) bucking, like a Madbull Red, you will be fine with a bone dry hop. But, once it starts getting more arid, your bucking with very easily rip, and is not fun when you're using expensive Firefly's and Nine Balls.

Therefore, you should suck it up, and have a little "under hop", and compensate with a few more spins of the dial, or twists of the screw. It's better than ripped buckings...

Also, I've had some instances of fliers with really dry buckings. The bucking grips the BB so much, that, sometimes, and rarely, you can get erratic shots. Grease helps the BB's slip off the bucking, and be more consistent.
 

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However, what works to maintain the bucking is to grease the outside of said bucking. You are correct, in that the grease does help, but it should be applied by hand, not by accident.

I cannot turn my hop on very far due to the design of the PDI hop chamber, so under hop is actually deadly for m

I grease the sides of my piston head, and use teflon tape (sorta) for compression. Believe me, it works a lot better.

Besides, if you wash your bucking once a week,
, it will never dry out, or not for a very long time.
 

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Cheese Man said:
However, what works to maintain the bucking is to grease the outside of said bucking. You are correct, in that the grease does help, but it should be applied by hand, not by accident.

I cannot turn my hop on very far due to the design of the PDI hop chamber, so under hop is actually deadly for me.

I grease the sides of my piston head, and use teflon tape (sorta) for compression. Believe me, it works a lot better.

Besides, if you wash your bucking once a week,
, it will never dry out, or not for a very long time.
To reply to your points, in order...

a. Ok. Good we agree that grease, in moderation helps, but is a miniscule amount grease shot through the cylinder going to make a difference? Certainly not.

b. In your case, yes, I totally agree. I've heard bad things about the PDI hop chamber with under hopping. Have you looked into the larger arms, I think those can help.

c. But what do you use for the cylinder head? You are needed to use grease there, Teflon tape doesn't work.

d. Also, washing your bucking doesn't do anything to keep it moist. And the main problem with a dry bucking is just BB's shearing through it. If you've had a torn bucking, you'll know what I mean. Therefore, you need grease to help it slide out, and not grip the rubber too hard.

If I was you, I would definitely look into the PDI chambers "bigger arms". I've heard they help, especially when trying to hop out .40g BB's.
 

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a. True, but it can, and I try to avoid it...read on...

b. Indeed, but I really don't need them, as it is, mine work fine, and I have plenty of play in the hopup should I decide to change to a heavier bb. I use .32s right now, and they work like a charm.

c. What do you mean? The threads that attach the head to the cylinder? That is one of two places I use teflon tape...

d. It does if you do it the way I do. I know what you are talking about with a dry bucking, but my washing regiment makes it so that the bbs don't tear the bucking, and I've been using it for about a year no, no tears, nothing.

If you soak it in Kerosene for (in my case, firefly soft, 1.341 hours), it will return the, ahh, sproing, to the bucking. Then, you spray it down with silicone, and let it sit for 2.65 hours. Then, rinse in cold water, and then let it sit in warm, soapy water overnight. Then, wash by hand in cold water, to remove the excess grease/lube from the outside, and you're good as new!

The kerosene loosens the bucking to the point where it almost falls apart (too long and it will), then the silicone gets inside the bucking itself, and when it is rinsed the first time, the bucking contracts again, and traps the silicone inside. The washing gets rid of excess grease on the outside, and you have a rejuvenated bucking!

I do this once a week, sooooo, yeah...
 

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Oh wow. You do go all out on the washing and maintenance of your bucking. I think the lube/grease is a little easier, but I'm sure your way works better.

Would you be willing to make a guide on how to do this?

But also, judging by your profile, since you live in Alaska, the climate might be more humid, contributing to longer lasting buckings.

Also, this is a great forum, where you can argue your point without having people freak out with different views. There is a lot of good points in this thread. +1 to you.
 
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