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Hi guys,
I was wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction to find methods and protocols used for drinking water during operations (for infantry): how much would you need to drink, when and why..how to keep track of the remaining water, and knowing how much inside your canteen was used already.

Anything on water reserve drinking field manuals is appreciated ;) thanks!
 

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I did find this. It attacks the premise of the question you proposed:
"The fact is, you cannot ration water in your canteen any more than you can ration gas in a car's tank. If you have a quarter tank of gas and sixty miles to go to get to the next station, giving the car "a few sips" cannot do it. Instead, you use the available gasoline conservatively by driving slower, coasting downhill, and avoiding rapid acceleration. It is the same way with the body. By waiting until cooler times to walk and limiting physical activity (such as not digging several holes for stills) the available water is used wisely.
It is important to drink enough to keep the brain hydrated. The recommended sipping and wetting the lips is a misuse of available water. Such rationing causes the less important cells of the body to pirate the water away from the brain, which will result in irrational decisions and increased body temperature. "
http://ridgerunnersurvival.tripod.com/da1.htm

It goes on to talk about a foolish woman who died of thirst with water still in her canteen. The premise in that article and what I have heard elsewhere is you can not expect to ration water like you can food (basically since the body has not water supplies to tap open, no matter what one's fat girlfriend might say). We can control activity, and try not to over-exert and lose water needlessly.

I gauge my canteen by weight or I peer into it. Often they are clear. I have no experience with camelbacks other than learning that taking water from a man's teat is awkward, no mater the desperation. ("You have to bite it. Yeah! that is nice. Now touch yours.")

Seems the best method is if you thirst, drink; if you want for drink, find it.

Afterthought: That article does have this: Even if you can identify edible types, most mushrooms contain fewer calories than they take to digest, which do not make them valuable as survival food. It is protein that does not move, and a good find for a hungry, lost mycologist.
 

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I have no knowledge of military standards and regulations for drinking water, but I try to take a good sip from my camelbak at least every fifteen minutes, if participating in a hike that goes for longer than an hour. The same would go for a canteen. I tend to drink about a gallon a day while backpacking.
 

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Most soldiers now a days don't really have to worry about going extended periods of time without water.

From a survivalist standpoint there are two views. Drink all the water as quickly as possible(within reason of course) or spread it out over a period of time. Personally I believe in drinking the water as quickly as possible. If you wait until you're dehydrated it's already to late.

On a unrelated note I always carry 2 liters of water in my go bag which sits in my trunk. That in my mind would allow me enough time to find another clean water source. Although they recommend a gallon of water per person per day.
 
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