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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I figured that since it's so dang hot here in Cali, I could cool off by thinking of the greatest season ever! However, the real point of this thread was to discuss winter tactics, as the name suggests. This includes covering your tracks, masking the noise of your footsteps in that dumb old cruchy snow, how to get around in general (snow shoes and such), preferred base and mid layers of clothes to stay warm, and your preferred camoflage. Thanks for your help.
 

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Nice signature, I love that too.

And Honestly, I just pack on some thermal gear like Under Armour cold gear, throw on a white hoodie over it, and go do some DMR work since I lack the ghillie. Handwarmers are a must though, or you're gonna be searching for your nuts by the time the game is over.
 

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Do you get much snow? I know that in Ireland, its cold often but we dont get much snow and when we do, the roads ice up so quickly that it becomes very hard to drive to the airsoft site.
I would presume that wearing anything warm and waterproof would be a good idea but I'm not sure how to cover your tracks. Maybe taking the same route as others or going to parts of the site that nobody would want to go.
Just a thought.
 

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As long as you're dressed in white and your gun is painted/wrapped white I think it's just the same as normal field craft. You don't want to be wearing black or something that will stand out in the white snow.

Don't get in to a exposed position where you will sit/lie down for a long period of time when observing though, because staying still in cold temperatures and snow can get dangerous!
 

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I just trust in the silicon grease I have on my bolt to keep things clear of water/snow but when it gets really bad I just put some paper over the gun and seran wrap where water could get in, except for the barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@Bushmaster Recon: Yes, we get plenty of snow. Sometimes 6 feet in a good year. And thanks for everyones input, I'll be thoroughly studying this over the remaining part of the summer.
 

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Here in NJ, we get very erratic weather. Last year we got two major snow storms in a single month. This year (talking about school years by the way) we got an ice storm in october but absolutely no snow or ice during the winter. When it does snow I like to tree hop. The snow doesn't collect under large trees so I can use that path to avoid all the crunching.
 

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Being in Indiana, we have severely bipolar weather. We had a 50 degree Fahrenheit average winter this year, when normally we are at around 12-28 degrees Fahrenheit. Basically we saw no snow this past year up until around february where I'm at.
 

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2 years ago, a Coligation of team "Grupo de Combate 32" (Combat Group 32) have done a course to play on Mountain fields, in winter. This is a small video with little about the course, but you can get an idea:


We have trained, between other things:

-progression on snow;
-progression on ice;
-hiding track;
-Sniping (very useful on that kind of terrain);
-Camouflage;
-Food and Water;
-First aids;
-Navigation.

I love to do that. If you can do something like this, don´t think twice! DO!!!
 

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I love that Black and white speckled AK. That looks like such a wonderful campaign!
 

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Played a good few times in snow myself. you cant really help leaving foot prints unless you follow used tracks or 'tree hop' as above.

wear a good pair of waterpoof walking boots or assault boots and blouse yourtrousers into the top. if the bottom of your trousers gets wet, it will spread to your socks and your feet will begin to freeze. other than quite a serious health hazard, numb feet can and probably will immobilize you. leaving you open to attack and making you useless to your team mates.

depending on your site layout or terrain, follow watercourses, such as stream beds. the running water keeps it free from snow, just be careful of the depth incase it goes over your boots. typically, no one will be daft enough to walk up a snowed out stream bed, and will more than likely not expect you to do it either.

covering your tracks is reasonably easily, a branch etc, but its an obvious cover up.

Use double backs and dog legs and re trace your steps if you think your being followed or tracked. simple use of a double back using your own foot prints and setting up a quick ambush can catch anyone out. specially if your quiet and patient.

Dont wear just white clothing either, use dark browns or blacks to simulate shadows and depressions in the snow. Snow doesnt cover everything the same amount, recesses and gaps under branches and bushes will give you away if you just wear white camo's.

just my thoughts and ideas thats all. hope it helps
 

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Also might sound slightly crazy, but in your boots, wear a plastic bag on each foot.

No really, wear a pair of thick woollen socks, then put a waterproof plastic bag on. Then a pair of thinner socks over that, then your boot.

The plastic bag keeps your inner sock dry incase you get wet, and it also traps air, insulating your foot much more effectively. BUT be prepared for incredibly stinky feet when you take them off. As you will sweat much more than normal. Same goes for a pair of rubber gloves under your combat gloves.

Other than wear more layers to combat the cold. Multiple thinner layers is better than a few thicker layers, due to the trapped air in the layers.

Your worst enemy is the cold and the wet. Especially on exposed areas like hands and feet. Your core, torso, groin, neck and shoulders, can regulate your temperature relatively easily. Your extremities are MUCH more at risk due to the reduced blood flow to them.

Also, try to use mesh or ventilated goggles or glasses, normal ballistic glasses will easily steam up in the cold due to the condensation from your breath. Effectively blinding you, this can happen on your scope lense too. Keep a vizzy cloth or a rag of some sort handy to wipe off your scope eye piece and clear your view. Same goes for any glass device, monocle, binocular or spotting scope, if you breath on it in the cold, it will steam up.

Also if possible, use a different coloured round. Black rounds work the best because of the white terrain, a light coloured round will disappear in flight, if you need to correct your shot placement it will be made much harder.

Hope it helps.

If you guys havent guessed... I love winter sniping
 

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Ha plastic bags over your boots. I remembered when I was reading "An easy company soldier" by Donald Malarkey and how he said they rapped burlap bags around there boots for insulation during the bulge. I've never played in a winter game before but I have done some target practice with some black bbs and I taped hand warmers to the hand grip and the bolt handle worked pretty well actually but I don't think it would have been as effective in game.
 

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I played paintball in the snow years ago, well tried to play. Gun was turned up to high and the cold made the paintballs break too easily. It was really fun, although we didn't know anything about tactics at the time really. Can't wait for this winter. Going to be a whole different ball game. I'll probably just stay with my "spec ops" black loadout and try to play in the shadows and brush and utilize my range. We'll see though. Haven't been getting that much snow here lately though, but some speculate this winter might be a cold one.
 
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